Did You Know You Can Treat Dog Seizures With Gabapentin?

Does your dog suffer from seizures or chronic nerve pain? If so, you can effectively manage them with the medication gabapentin. You can actually use this medication with cats as well.

This drug is structured so that it is similar to neurotransmitter GABA without actually causing any type of interference. While this particular type of functional interference is not a risk, there are some side effects of this medication when used for dogs. As a result, you should only use gabapentin with your dog if you are under the supervision of a veterinarian.

What is The Gabapentin Dosage Amount for Dogs

The amount gabapentin that you will need to give your dog can vary as it is different for each dog. The more severe the pain your dog is experiencing, the higher the dosage of the medication to treat those pains. Most veterinarians agree that gabapentin works best for dogs when used in conjunction with another type of pain reliever. These are often called NSAIDS.

Know that every dog has a different reaction to the medication and the dosage amount, which is why it is so important that you only  administer this to your dog with the supervision of your veterinarian.

For the best results with your dosage, only administer the medication in its oral solution form to the dog. It offers easy administration of the drug and works perfectly with the metabolism of the dog and the short active half-life of the medication.

What Are The Uses of Gabapentin for Dogs?

You might be wondering if this drug is the solution that you have been looking for all this time for your pet. The simple answer is that gabapentin is effective at managing pain for dogs as well as seizures. However, there are several different conditions and disorders in dogs that the medication is successful in treating or managing.

While gapapentin is often prescribed for dog seizures, it is actually not effective in treating them on its own, unlike in humans where it can be used by itself. Instead, the medication has to be used in conjunction with other medications as part of an overall management plans for dog epilepsy.

As a stand alone treatment solution, there are several disorders in dogs that this medication can treat, such as:

  • chronic arthritis pain
  • allodynia
  • hyperalagesia
  • other nerve pain disorders

 What Are Some Gabapentin Side Effects for Dogs?

Just like any other medication, the use of gabapentin for dogs is not without the possibility of side effects. In most cases, the common side effects are ataxia and mild sedation. That being said, there are some more serious side effects that can occur with gabapentin usage with dogs. These serious side effects are normally the result of exceeding the recommend dosage.

Some of the bad side effects to watch out for include:

  • somnolence
  • severe lethargy
  • intense ataxia
  • depression

Since these normally occur from an overdose of the medication, you should take steps to empty the gut of the animal if you discover an overdose. Doing so can prevent these things from happening.

Are There Any Precautions With Gabapentin for Dogs?

When you get the medication, ensure that you are getting the oral solution approved for dogs and not the one of humans. This is vitally important because the version for human consumption contains xylitol, which is something toxic to dogs.

Also remember to never abruptly stop giving this medication to your dog as it can lead to some intense withdrawal symptoms. Doing so can give your dog intense pain or seizures.

Gapapentin can have a negative effect on certain conditions, such as renal complications and liver disorders. As a result, discuss the usage of this medication with your veterinarian if your dog suffers from those conditions. Otherwise, there could be some serious side effects for the animal.

5 thoughts on “Did You Know You Can Treat Dog Seizures With Gabapentin?

  1. Jane Pyle

    I am trying to find out how to dose my dog with gabapentin. She is a 7 year old Boston Terrier which we have raised from puppyhood. I have been concerned over her as over the last few months we noticed her have what seem to be muscle spasms in her legs, and she is also losing her hair. Her overall behavior is very lethargic, she never wants to play. She also has a problem in her right knee that really requires surgery to repair, which we cannot afford, and I think she possibly has either arthritis in her hips or dysplasia because she cannot stand to have that area touched anymore and it used to be one of her favorite scratch or massage spots.
    We recently moved and have not found a vet who we like…one kept trying to tell me she was “chasing rabbits”, and I may have bought into had I not been a dog owner for the majority of my life and also the proud “mama” of 4 other Bostons. So when it comes to knowing when a dog is dreaming and when they are not I think I am somewhat knowledgeable. And since it happens when she is obviously wide awake that would be another clue. The 2nd vet recommended gabapentin and my husband is prescribed that same medication for diabetic nerve pain. We are on a fixed income and to be able to use what we already have more than enough of would help us tremendously. When we explained that to the vet, and asked if he could assist us by telling us the dosage for her he became very adamant in the dangers of misdosing her if we tried to do this at home. Although I do agree with him that we do not want to give her the wrong dose I felt that in asking him to help us so that we could do it safely at home was indicative of our sincerity not to harm our baby.
    I simply would like to give her the dose that would be correct for her size and weight, she is 11″ high at the shoulder and weighs 17 pounds. Could you help with this? I am sorry to ramble on like this but I felt that an explanation of our situation may help in resolving our problem.

    Reply
    1. madfuskills Post author

      Hi Jane,

      Unfortunately, the commercially available human liquid-product contains xylitol, which can be hepatotoxic in dogs. For this reason, you really need to get it from a vet in order to give it to your dog.

      Reply
    2. LW

      hi jane – my dog had the same thing happening with what I thought were tremors or muscle spasms. Come to find out they are partial seizures due to a brain tumor. You really should consult a vet about this possibility. My dog is almost 10yrs old and odd thing started happening about 4 weeks ago: panting, extreme thirst, not very hungry, tired and of course the ‘tremors’.

      Reply
  2. LW

    Jane – also gabapentin can be bought online for 24 cents a pill (300mg). That cost is extremely low! Don’t pay what your vet is asking. You can get a 3 month supply for less than $24, that’s $8/month.

    Reply
  3. LW

    Jane – you need to buy the gabapentin that is specific for dogs. Also, the dosage amount depends on your dog’s issue(s) not her weight. The worse the seizures and/or pain the higher the dose, not to exceed 1200mg/day. Also, once you start this medication it should not be stopped. You will need to taper off. Sorry for all of the emails.

    Reply

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